Hemisphere:  Southern  ·  Constellation: Vela (Vel)  ·  Contains:  NGC 3201
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NGC 3201, 



    
        

            Gary Imm
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NGC 3201

Getting plate-solving status, please wait...
NGC 3201, 



    
        

            Gary Imm
Powered byPixInsight

NGC 3201

Imaging telescopes or lenses: Orion EON 130mm ED Triplet APO

Imaging cameras: ZWO ASI1600MM-Cool

Mounts: Astro-Physics Mach1GTO

Guiding telescopes or lenses: Orion 60mm Guidescope

Guiding cameras: Orion StarShoot AutoGuider Pro Mono

Focal reducers: Orion 3" Field Flattener

Software: Main Sequence Software Sequence Generator Pro  ·  PixInsight  ·  Stark Labs PHD2 2.6.3

Filters: Astrodon Green 31mm Gen2 I-Series  ·  Astrodon Blue 31mm Gen2 I-Series  ·  Astrodon Red 31mm Gen2 I-Series

Accessory: ZWO EFW  ·  Feathertouch Focuser Boss II Electronic Focusing Control


Dates:Jan. 5, 2018

Frames:
Astrodon Blue 31mm Gen2 I-Series: 30x60" (30') (gain: 139.00) -20C bin 1x1
Astrodon Green 31mm Gen2 I-Series: 30x60" (30') (gain: 139.00) -20C bin 1x1
Astrodon Red 31mm Gen2 I-Series: 30x60" (30') (gain: 139.00) -20C bin 1x1

Integration: 1h 30'

Avg. Moon age: 18.63 days

Avg. Moon phase: 84.05%


Astrometry.net job: 1903426

RA center: 10h 17' 38"

DEC center: -46° 25' 4"

Pixel scale: 0.854 arcsec/pixel

Orientation: 86.588 degrees

Field radius: 0.610 degrees


Resolution: 4480x2520

Locations: Backyard (Mag 20.8 - Bortle 4.5), Onalaska, Texas, United States

Data source: Backyard

Description

This object is a globular cluster located 17,000 light years away in the southern constellation of Vela. This is one of the few globular clusters where I am able to resolve stars throughout the cluster, including those in the core.

This cluster is most famous for its direction of motion, going against the direction of rotation of most other objects in our Milky Way galaxy. Because of this, it is approaching us faster than any other known cluster. It's Caldwell 79 designation indicates that it lies far south in the skies, at a declination of -46 degrees with a transit of 13 degrees above my horizon.

To me, the core of the cluster looks distinctly like an arrowhead pointing to the right. The cluster itself is not spherical but has an odd shape, something that the astronomer William Herschel called "irregularly " round.

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